I need MadWhale because if even science and magic, two of the most different things in the world, can come together the why can’t Love bring any two people together no matter how odd they both are?

Swan Queen’s unintentional beauty

kddy:

Swan Queen would be beautiful because I am pretty sure that the only issue Snow or Charming or anyone else would have with this relationship is the fact that their Savior fell in love with the Evil Queen. There never would be a “You what? With another woman?!”, there might be a “But she is evil!!! She ruined our lives. She stole us 28 years, how can you possibly love her”. And that is what makes it beautiful. There is no question about sexuality here, just about love, making “gay love” as normal and as strong and as beautiful as “straight love”.

They never had to set out to write up a gay character, all they ever wrote led up to this moment were the next logical step would be to make them a couple. And it’s wonderful, characters that were previously perceived as straight, as normal, without any “clichés” or “stereotypes” just fell in love with a person of the same sex and it isn’t a big thing, at least not in Storybrooke or Fairytale Land.

This show introduced magic into a land without magic, why not also introduce tolerance and open-mindedness in a world where people are still evaluated based on their sex, sexual orientation, skin colour and religious beliefs?

Having two characters in a same sex relationship that were never intended to be gay is a big step towards “normalizing” homosexuality.  

Our Happy Endings turned 1 today!

Our Happy Endings turned 1 today!

(Source: assets)

Anonymous asked: Just curious, when does your virtual series come out?

Our Happy Endings is not having a virtual series. You’d have to ask the people organizing that.

why queer representation matters

nicodianggelo:

let’s say you’re a 12 year old boy, and you have a crush on a boy, and as much as you try to ignore it, you know you do. you think this is really weird and not normal and you start to hate yourself for it.

now let’s say, a few months later, you watch a movie. the movie isn’t that great (in fact, it’s pretty bad) but there’s a character in it. a male character in love with another male character. and he’s not weird. he has plenty of friends and plenty of support. 

that 12 year old boy was me. and because of me finding out about movies and books and tv shows with queer characters, and finding out that there were dozens of kids just like me, i liked myself again. 

if a character is queer, go ahead! make a big deal of it! LGBTQ people are constantly treated like they’re subpar, and they deserve positive treatment for once. 

and if a character isn’t canonically queer, go ahead and headcanon them as LGBTQ. that’s fine. that’s fucking awesome. 

if you’re straight / cis, you see people like you in every piece of media you consume. you don’t know what it’s like. it made such a difference to see people like me. 

(via nicodianggelo-deactivated201312)

delladilly:

i think i am developing a better appreciation for subtextual and metaphorical literary discussions of queerness. and i like the idea of that, i like having a secret history that’s mine alone to unravel. i like learning about maurice sendak and trina schart hyman and howard ashman and how they shared all the things they weren’t allowed to say.

but at the end of the day, at the end of today, metaphors and codes are for people who already know how to read them. and i don’t think they’re sufficient today— i don’t think they’re revolutionary today. i am tired of queerness being a literary discussion held in the corner by people already in the know. i am tired of being told that explicit queerness is not as subversive. i am tired of feeling paratextual, or niche, or unspeakable.

i just think that if i— as a twelve year old baby gay who didn’t know any lgbtq people or that you were allowed to be lgbtq or even that “gay” was a legitimate thing and not just something older kids yelled out bus windows—

if i could have read your book or watched your thing and not noticed that it or its characters were queer, if i could have finished it and still not realized it was about me specifically and still felt alone and confused, that’s not good enough anymore.

(via witchpieceoftoast)

tasteherforbiddenfruits asked: I just made onceuponsomequeers which is modeled after magicqueers and is a place for people to submit their queer headcanons about the characters/the show :)

onceuponsomequeers

relax-o-vision:

Since we’re on a “repeat everything we’ve been through with Brittana already” trip one Once Upon a Time, let me repeat what I wanted for Santana and what I now want for Mulan:

I want a woman to court her. Properly. 

Someone girly, someone butch. I don’t care. But I want that woman to be all flustered in Mulan’s presence, and I want her to really work on getting her attention. Not flowers and chocolates and all that cheesy crap, though. I want that woman to understand where Mulan’s coming from, and to make sure she always knows what she’s worth. I want that woman to give Mulan the feeling of being desirable (let’s face it, we’d all be standing in line for her; I think her treatment on the show is a crime against humanity). It should be someone with experience, too. Someone who knows how to get the girl…. someone who’s smitten entirely nonetheless. Someone who melts upon seeing Mulan the very first time. 

The OuaT Virtual Series

So, we’re starting a Once Upon a Time Virtual Series, complete with Virtual Seasons and episodes. Some basics:

  1. SQ is endgame, guaranteed, though it will be developed naturally
  2. Follows canon through S2 finale
  3. Ruby/Red is not leaving
  4. Open to the whole fandom
  5. No character’s sexuality is set until it’s set. From the start, everyone is considered on the spectrum somewhere.

We have a staff of about 12 people currently, and are bringing on more every day. It will be a very queer-friendly, gender-friendly show. It will be all text and illustrations and we plan lots of fandom participation. So, yeah, that’s it. If anyone has any questions or wants to know how they can get involved, please send an ASK to silverbluemoon or an email to OUaTVS@gmail.com.

We will be auditioning Role-Players soon. :D We’re very excited; I hope you will join us!! :D The tag to follow on tumblr is #OUaTVS.

Queer Storyteller’s Collaborative

calliopesmuse:

“If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” 

- Toni Morrison

***

Have you ever watched a TV show and wished the writers had taken your favorite character down a different path, preferably not a straight path?

Are you tired of seeing yet another movie where a strong female character of ambiguous sexual orientation is killed?

Have you ever wished there were more images of transgender characters that were something other than drag queens and prostitutes?

 

Instead of wishing others would write the stories we want to see, why don’t we simply write them ourselves?

 

That’s what the Queer Storyteller’s Collaborative would be about. Creating a space where LGBTQ people can write, engage, inspire, interact, learn, and share their written works or potential works.

Perhaps you’re like me and have spent ten years as a fan fiction writer, but now you’re ready to take the big leap into getting published.

Perhaps you’re already published in queer presses but dream of going mainstream. 

Maybe you have never written before but want a safe space to try, a place where you can be encouraged and grow.

 

What the Queer Storyteller’s Collaborative will be:

- an online forum that is a safe space for writers (and future writers) to share and engage with each other

- a place for brainstorming ideas, getting feedback on drafts, finding prompt challenges, and more

- a resource for finding professional writing contests, publications, and information on becoming a published writer

- a place where assumptions and personal stereotypes can be challenged and questioned in order to improve one’s writing, characterization, and plot development

What the Queer Storyteller’s Collaborative will NOT be:

- a place to have fan fiction posted or beta’d (unless you plan to turn a piece of fan fiction into an original work, then it’s welcome)

- a spot to bring your fandom wars

- a forum to belittle or criticize writers and potential writers with unwarranted cruelty (there’s constructive criticism and then there’s just being mean - no mean girls allowed!)

 

What is the goal of the Queer Storyteller’s Collaborative?

Simple. To encourage and develop the talents and potential of queer writer’s around the world and to push their work out into the world in order to create a critical mass of LGBTQ voices in the written arts.

 

If this sounds like something for you, just like or reblog this post so I can see if there is enough interest in moving forward with creating a forum for us.

eshusplayground:

Please reblog this for your fandom(s).

(Also, don’t forget to check out The Rainbow Gallery’s Facebook page!)

Comments from the Rainbow Gallery: A video campaign for LGBTQ fans

eshusplayground:

eshusplayground:

You may have heard that I’ve been brainstorming a video campaign for LGBTQ fans who want to lend their own voices to make fandom and maisntream TV and film a safer and more inclusive space.

THE NEED

For many of us, fandom has been a sanctuary for LGBTQ people who don’t necessarily have such spaces in everyday life. Fandom has given many of us an opportunity to explore our identities and create community we otherwise do not have. In a world where we still fight for acceptance, justice, and equality, fandom has even saved lives.

Unfortunately, the people involved with making the TV shows and movies we love don’t always grasp that. So, they sometimes say and do things that wind up alienating us from something that once gave us joy and inspiration.

This is unacceptable. This has to change.

What follows is just one piece of trying to make that change.

THE IDEA

The Rainbow Gallery is a video campaign that aims to create a more inclusive space for LGBTQ fans in mainstream TV and film.

By sharing our perspectives, experiences, and insights, The Rainbow Gallery seeks to:

  1. Let fellow LGBTQ fans know that they are not alone
  2. Show people that LGBTQ fans are real people and not merely “issues”
  3. Put industry professionals—studio execs, producers, directors, writers, actors, critics, etc.—on the right track when talking to and about LGBTQ fans and the things that matter to us
  4. Get straight allies in film and television on the same page as LGBTQ fans when it comes to how they can support and advocate for us
  5. Pave the way for better representation of LGBTQ people in mainstream film and television

THE METHOD

Much like the It Gets Better campaign, video contributions from LGBTQ fans form the core of The Rainbow Gallery.

The format of the videos can vary from a simple chat in front of a camera to voice-over narration to text and music, whatever makes the person most comfortable because it’s not always safe to be out as LGBTQ.

Videos can discuss a variety of topics, including:

  • media representation
  • fetishization
  • queer-baiting
  • fandom
  • straight allies
  • best practices
  • personal stories
  • and more

WHAT THE RAINBOW GALLERY NEEDS

The Rainbow Gallery basically needs two things: 1) create the message, and 2) get the message out there.

To start with, this means:

  1. Content for a 5-10 minute intro video with people answering various prompt questions.
  2. Videos from LGBTQ fans in line with the mission and goals of The Rainbow Gallery
  3. At least 1,000 people following the campaign and talking about it
  4. Twitter account, Facebook page, maybe a Tumblr
  5. Press release to LGBTQ-oriented media outlets

HOW YOU CAN HELP

There are a lot of things you can do to help (video editing, making a website, etc.), but the easiest are:

  1. Reblog this post for your followers and tag it with “rainbow gallery”
  2. Follow the “rainbow gallery” tag on Tumblr
  3. Use the #rainbowgallery hashtag when tweeting about The Rainbow Gallery
  4. Share links on Twitter and Facebook
  5. Tweet about The Rainbow Gallery to people affiliated with your favorite TV shows and films
  6. Like The Rainbow Gallery Facebook page
  7. Come up with prompt questions for people making videos
  8. Something clever and amazing that would make everything so much better

CONCLUSION

I guess that now is as good a time as any to explain why this means so much to me.

I’m not doing this because fandom is an untapped market I want to maximize for its earning potential. I’m doing this because, despite its flaws, I’ve seen in fandom visions of the world I want to live in. A world where who I am is not a resource to be exploited or a problem to be solved.

Every fandom I’ve participated in has had so much love, passion, talent, creativity, intelligence, kindness, generosity, and wisdom that it strikes me as shameful that the people who offer all these wonderful gifts are made to feel invisible, insignificant, and expendable by those who give life to the stories and characters they love.

I believe that no one deserves to feel invisible. I believe that no one deserves to feel insignificant. I believe that no one deserves to feel expendable.

I refuse to accept this is “just the way it is.” I refuse to accept this as inevitable. I refuse to accept this, period.

I want to do everything I can to change this so that me and my friends can play in the same sandbox as everybody else and not have to deal with any bullshit.

Will you join me?

A few prompt questions for those of you who want to get started on the video. Use as you see fit.

  1. Why is fandom important to you as an LGBTQ person?
  2. What are some issues and experiences in film, TV, and fandom that affect you as an LGBTQ fan?
  3. How can film, TV, and fandom make itself more welcoming and inclusive toward you as an LGBTQ fan?
  4. What do you believe are the most important things people need to understand about being an LGBTQ fan?
  5. If you could change one thing about the ways that people talk to and about LGBTQ people in film, TV, and fandom, what would it be?

Please reblog for your followers and tag with “rainbow gallery” and your LGBTQ characters and ships (canon or non-canon).

Comments from the Rainbow Gallery: A video campaign for LGBTQ fans

eshusplayground:

You may have heard that I’ve been brainstorming a video campaign for LGBTQ fans who want to lend their own voices to make fandom and maisntream TV and film a safer and more inclusive space.

THE NEED

For many of us, fandom has been a sanctuary for LGBTQ people who don’t necessarily have such spaces in everyday life. Fandom has given many of us an opportunity to explore our identities and create community we otherwise do not have. In a world where we still fight for acceptance, justice, and equality, fandom has even saved lives.

Unfortunately, the people involved with making the TV shows and movies we love don’t always grasp that. So, they sometimes say and do things that wind up alienating us from something that once gave us joy and inspiration.

This is unacceptable. This has to change.

What follows is just one piece of trying to make that change.

THE IDEA

The Rainbow Gallery is a video campaign that aims to create a more inclusive space for LGBTQ fans in mainstream TV and film.

By sharing our perspectives, experiences, and insights, The Rainbow Gallery seeks to:

  1. Let fellow LGBTQ fans know that they are not alone
  2. Show people that LGBTQ fans are real people and not merely “issues”
  3. Put industry professionals—studio execs, producers, directors, writers, actors, critics, etc.—on the right track when talking to and about LGBTQ fans and the things that matter to us
  4. Get straight allies in film and television on the same page as LGBTQ fans when it comes to how they can support and advocate for us
  5. Pave the way for better representation of LGBTQ people in mainstream film and television

THE METHOD

Much like the It Gets Better campaign, video contributions from LGBTQ fans form the core of The Rainbow Gallery.

The format of the videos can vary from a simple chat in front of a camera to voice-over narration to text and music, whatever makes the person most comfortable because it’s not always safe to be out as LGBTQ.

Videos can discuss a variety of topics, including:

  • media representation
  • fetishization
  • queer-baiting
  • fandom
  • straight allies
  • best practices
  • personal stories
  • and more

WHAT THE RAINBOW GALLERY NEEDS

The Rainbow Gallery basically needs two things: 1) create the message, and 2) get the message out there.

To start with, this means:

  1. Content for a 5-10 minute intro video with people answering various prompt questions.
  2. Videos from LGBTQ fans in line with the mission and goals of The Rainbow Gallery
  3. At least 1,000 people following the campaign and talking about it
  4. Twitter account, Facebook page, maybe a Tumblr
  5. Press release to LGBTQ-oriented media outlets

HOW YOU CAN HELP

There are a lot of things you can do to help (video editing, making a website, etc.), but the easiest are:

  1. Reblog this post for your followers and tag it with “rainbow gallery”
  2. Follow the “rainbow gallery” tag on Tumblr
  3. Use the #rainbowgallery hashtag when tweeting about The Rainbow Gallery
  4. Share links on Twitter and Facebook
  5. Tweet about The Rainbow Gallery to people affiliated with your favorite TV shows and films
  6. Like The Rainbow Gallery Facebook page
  7. Come up with prompt questions for people making videos
  8. Something clever and amazing that would make everything so much better

CONCLUSION

I guess that now is as good a time as any to explain why this means so much to me.

I’m not doing this because fandom is an untapped market I want to maximize for its earning potential. I’m doing this because, despite its flaws, I’ve seen in fandom visions of the world I want to live in. A world where who I am is not a resource to be exploited or a problem to be solved.

Every fandom I’ve participated in has had so much love, passion, talent, creativity, intelligence, kindness, generosity, and wisdom that it strikes me as shameful that the people who offer all these wonderful gifts are made to feel invisible, insignificant, and expendable by those who give life to the stories and characters they love.

I believe that no one deserves to feel invisible. I believe that no one deserves to feel insignificant. I believe that no one deserves to feel expendable.

I refuse to accept this is “just the way it is.” I refuse to accept this as inevitable. I refuse to accept this, period.

I want to do everything I can to change this so that me and my friends can play in the same sandbox as everybody else and not have to deal with any bullshit.

Will you join me?

From their Tumblr:

Do you want to be involved in a femslash fandom that you could own a part of, be a part of, create a part of?

Do you have experience writing fanfics? making fanvids? making fanart? photography,filming, or acting?

If you don’t you can still be highly involved.